Tuesday, 10 January 2017

Call for Papers for ICLC 2017 - reminder

Hopefully you will have had time to consider over the Christmas and New Year break what sort of paper you would like to submit for the International Clinical Librarian Conference 2017. If you have, then here is the submission form. http://www.uhl-library.nhs.uk/iclc/abstracts.html


Friday, 6 January 2017

Transfusion Evidence Library

This database of systematic reviews, RCTs and economic studies relevant to transfusion medicine is available to the NHS.  It is compiled by the Systematic Review Initiative, an Oxford based clinical research group.

I must admit this is the first time I have used it.    Search terms used in my exploration are in bold.

Areas covered are listed.   The main audience will be people involved in transfusion medicine, but there is material in it of interest to surgeons, critical care specialists and haematologists. 

The search guide gives search tips, and details of how records are found for inclusion.
  • Total knee replacement finds 164 records
  • Phrase searching is allowed, so “Total knee replacement” 90
  • Boolean is allowed, so total knee (replacement OR arthroplasty) finds 283
  • Like PubMed, strings of words are AND’ed, so total AND knee AND (replacement OR arthroplasty) also finds 283.

Results can be filtered by:
  • Clinical specialty – these include, of course, blood donors, but also haematology and oncology, obstetrics and gynaecology, and surgery.   
  • Subject area - these include Fractionated blood products (under “Alternatives to blood”) and Management of anaemia (under “Clinical Practice”).
  • Study design - SR, RCT or economic.
  • Text availability - TEL links to some publishers and providers like Ovid, but also to things like PubMed Central.

You can apply only one filter from each group at a time.  You can apply filters from different groups together, for example, clinical specialty and study design.  Filters stay applied to searches until you clear them.

Some items (not many in any of the searches I did) have clinical commentaries evaluating quality.

For some searches, you see (at the end of the first page) the expanded query”. This looks like the search that is actually done, but I am not sure.  Sickle cell anaemia does not show an expanded query, where sickle cell anemia does, although both searches give the same number of results. Searching hiv gets the same number as searching hiv OR “human immunodeficiency virus”, and neither shows an expanded query.  For ITP (not the best search in the world!), the expanded query suggests it has searched inosine triphosphate, but the results suggest it has searched immune thrombocytopenia (which is what I was thinking of).   (Using the full name of ITP finds more)

Transfusion Evidence Library looks useful, and I plan to try it out on search requests, where appropriate.  We will be promoting it to our Transfusion team. 


Have you used it?    Please put your thoughts, or anything I have missed or got confused about, in a comment.

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Run VT

According to HLWIKI encyclopedia, Clinical Librarian (CL) provides specialized library services in teaching hospitals and other health organisations by participating in clinical activities and hospital rounds with health providers. By working closely with assigned teams of clinicians, a clinical librarian can respond to information needs that arise in situ within the clinic. This makes them more 'clinic-driven' than 'library-driven'. Furthermore, Clinical Librarians facilitates access to the medical literature to answer the health professionals most-pressing clinical questions; as such, CLs perform, mediate and coach users through the search process and in locating the best medical evidence from the medical literature. Assistance can also extend to locating the full text of documents in print and electronic formats. 

The health education team in western Sussex has developed a You Tube video 
https://youtu.be/2iZz38HOhAg that further highlights the value of a clinical librarian. 


Web resources about dialysis

It is easy to look for information on the web, but not always easy to find useful things.  The vast number of resources, and their variable quality, mean it is useful sometimes to have a list of selected resources, with notes.

For that reason, the Health Libraries Group Newsletter publishes an "Internet Sites of Interest" column, which (declaration of interest!) I edit.

The hope is that the column is a useful place for health librarians to start with new subject areas.   And also a useful thing to share with library users, whether students or practitioners. 

The latest column is a list of sites about dialysis, one of my clinical areas, so I was able to ask them for suggestions.  There are brief notes about each site, and a quick list of definitions. The column (and previous ones) is listed here.  

Please do use and share the list, with (of course) acknowledgement to the HLG Newsletter.

End of self promotion!

Thursday, 22 December 2016

Avian influenza (bird flu) resources

Leicester City Council, according to a story in the Leicester Mercury of 22nd December, are putting up notices to ask the public to report dead ducks and other water birds.  This follows bird flu on a poultry farm in Lincolnshire some days ago.   Some brief notes about useful resources about avian influenza seems timely.

Leicester City Council's information, including how to report, is here.   Check your local council, of course, if you are not in Leicester!

Then look at UK Government information.  This will tell you the latest situation, about restrictions on movement, and gives advice for the public.  The site confirms that the farm is affected by the H5N8 strain.    Note added 5th January 2017 - there is an update from the UK government here.

There is no suggestion that I have seen that humans are affected, here in the UK or elsewhere in Europe (there have been cases among birds elsewhere in Europe).   So, purely on a "just in case" basis, therefore, I mention Public Health England's information on symptoms, diagnosis and management, and epidemiology, last updated earlier in 2016.

For more news on avian influenza, see news from CIDRAP, the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.  It does report cases from Europe, so will give you a wider picture.  It reports cases beyond Europe, as well, of course.

Another site for a global view is PROMED-Mail.  Look at the news feed on the left of the page, and click an item for more detail.   You can use the map to find information about infectious disease cases by location.  A larger map is here.

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

UHL appears in the Altmetrics Top 100

Altmetrics is a way to measure impact of an article.  It counts the number of times an article is mentioned on social media, in the news, or on blogs.

The Altmetrics Top 100 is the list of the 100 articles that have got the most attention in 2016.

I am grateful to my colleague Selina Lock at the University of Leicester Library for spotting that number 22 in the list is a paper with a co-author from UHL, Roger Kockelbergh in Urology:


Hamdy, F.C., Donovan, J.L., Lane, J.A., Mason, M., Metcalfe, C., Holding, P., Davis, M., Peters, T.J., Turner, E.L., Martin, R.M., Oxley, J., Robinson, M., Staffurth, J., Walsh, E., Bollina, P., Catto, J., Doble, A., Doherty, A., Gillatt, D., Kockelbergh, R., Kynaston, H., Paul, A., Powell, P., Prescott, S., Rosario, D.J., Rowe, E. & Neal, D.E. 2016, "10-Year Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer", N Engl J Med, vol. 375, no. 15, pp. 1415-1424.


There is more about Altmetrics on our Writing Club blog.

Monday, 12 December 2016

Watch out for predatory publishers - Writing Club Blog Post

Keith Nockels, Clinical Librarian at UHL, has written a piece for our writing club blog on 'Predatory Publishing'.  Your thoughts and experiences of this would be welcomed.

Are clinical researchers publishing via Open Access?  Is there pressure to do this from funders?  Are clinicians being targeted by predatory publishers and are they using this route to publish their research?

https://uhlwritingclub.wordpress.com/2016/12/12/watch-out-for-predatory-publishers/